Cleaning a well used travel mug

A Clean Travel Mug is a Beautiful Thing

I enjoy drinking a cup of tea almost every day. In fact, I have a Contigo travel mug that I use to brew my tea in the morning and take to work. I prefer making my own tea at home where I have many choices instead of at work where there is only the cheap work supplied tea. I also feel that the temperature of the water when brewing the tea is important, and it can be difficult to get boiling water at work.

There is a downside though to using the same travel mug over and over again. Even though I wash the mug out every day, scrub it with a brush and use soap on it, I still get a dark, brown buildup in the mug.

 

Travel Mug Ready to be Cleaned

Travel Mug Ready to be Cleaned

 

While researching different ways to clean this residue off the mug I found the following method.

  1. Place the travel mug in a sink.
  2. Add a tablespoon of baking soda.
  3. Add a tablespoon of hydrogen peroxide.
  4. Add boiling water to the mug until it reaches the top.

This could not be any easier! I was amazed at how clean my mug turned out. After adding the boiling water the liquid will fizz up and may run over the edges, however, that is normal. In fact, you’ll be able to hear the sound of the peroxide and baking soda interacting together and forming thousands of little bubbles.

I could actually see the liquid and bubbles go from clear looking to a dark brown in less than a minute.

Fizzing Travel Mug

Fizzing Travel Mug

After about 5 – 10 minutes add cold water to the mixture in the mug. Then, carefully, pour out the liquid into the sink and down the drain. After my first attempt on my mug, which I have been using almost every day for a year, almost all of the residue had come off. I took a bottle brush and scrubbed on what was left and almost all the rest came off. I’ll admit my first try I was a bit impatient, and probably should have left it soaking for a few more minutes. I redid the process and the remaining residue also came off. The result? A travel mug interior that looked brand new. The inside of my travel mug is stainless steel and I could not see the steel before starting this cleaning process.

Clean Travel Mug

Sparkling Clean Travel Mug

Since this process was so effective and easy I then proceeded to clean the other travel mugs in our house. They all came out sparkling clean and looking like new. I don’t know about you, but if I can get something super clean without having to scrub on it for hours at a time, I’m all for it.

On a side note, this work for coffee stained travel mugs as well. So whether you enjoy tea, coffee, or hot chocolate, give this a try.

Enjoy a clean mug!

– Jason Snell

I want to eat, not mow

First off, let me start this post by saying that I like food. I mean, I really enjoy fresh, good food. To that end more of the side yard this year has disappeared and the garden there continues to grow. Since my last post I have continued to dig up the grass and now have several potatoes growing. The green beans are starting to come up, and we’ve got asparagus planted. The sad thing about the asparagus is that it takes a few years to really get going. I thought I’d share a few photos of the changes that have happened.

 

Young garden plants

Young garden plants

In the above photo several plants are starting to come along. The black tubing is drip irrigation I have laid down in the garden. The drip irrigation makes it much easier to water all the plants and can use less water. This year I am using sprinklers for most of the garden, but as the garden continues to mature and I figure out what I want to do I’ll transition over to more and more water emitters.

 

Lettuce and Swiss Chard growing in a garden box

Lettuce and Swiss Chard growing in a garden box

The garden box from last year full of lettuce and swiss chard.

Broccoli growing in a garden box

Broccoli growing in a garden box

This is the first attempt made at growing broccoli. So far there are heads of broccoli growing on almost every plant.

Fenced in garden

Fenced in garden

A larger view of the garden. It doesn’t seem very full yet, but give it a month or two and I’ll start having trouble finding a place to walk.

Herbs growing

Herbs growing

In the back yard we have two cut down wine barrels growing various herbs. The brown earth box in the photo contains seeds for several kinds of flowers that honeybees like. The flowers came from Glorybee in Eugene, Oregon.

Potatoes Sprouting in dirt

Potatoes Sprouting

Since I am from Idaho, I have to include one of the things we’re famous for. Potatoes! Yes, that is two different kinds of potatoes I’m trying to grow this year. The last two years I’ve tried using a potato bag with with mixed results. This year these spuds are looking much better!

Have any fun plants you’re trying out this year for the first time? Got any good gardening tips? Leave a comment below!

Happy Gardening!

– Jason Snell

Spring Gardening

It’s been awhile since I posted on a topic. I am sad to say my honeybees did not make it over the winter. However, the spring is here and it’s time to get ready for garden season. While I am working on the garden I am also hoping to find a new swarm of bees to populate my hives. I love the sounds of the bees wings humming through the air while I’m out in the garden area. In fact, this year will be the biggest garden yet!

Beginning garden in the side yard

Spring start to a new garden area

Instead of watering grass in the side yard, which I can’t eat, I’ve turned it into a gardening area. I’m really excited about the what I’m growing this year. I have drip irrigation started and will soon have full coverage for all of my plants.

This year I’m trying some new plants.

  • Eggplant
  • Tomatillos
  • Broccoli
  • Pole Green Beans
  • Bok choy
  • Asparagus

In addition we’ve planted tomatoes, jalapenos, lettuces, pumpkins, bell peppers, honey dew, and swiss chard.

If you have any gardening tips you’ve picked up over the years feel free to send me a message or comment below.

Happy Gardening!

– Jason Snell